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Thread: Young whipper-snappers...

  1. #21
    abcraghead Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryce View Post
    The D100 is gone, won't be replaced. Just purchased a lot of film.
    Bah. Here I was hoping you might still have it and be willing to part with it for a reasonable price.... :-P

    The F80 is a very solid camera. I shoot with the N80, the U.S. variant. Although I know Kent had a few and broke 'em, remember that Kent uses his N80s for ice-picks, wheel chocks, and other non-certified uses of cameras that North Dakotans go in for. Mine is about 6 years old by now and I got it in used but EX condition. Older lenses do hunt a bit, but otherwise the camera has never failed me. It went in for its first repair last month when the back door ceased to stay shut. $39 later its good as new.

    I would advise that you get the battery grip for the F80. It's worth the investment. Not only does it give you better battery power (critical in cold weather) but it also balances the camera a bit better for when you *do* need to handhold.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    close to Lake Ontario in Burlington, ON Canada
    Posts
    470

    Default Grip for F80

    Quote Originally Posted by abcraghead View Post
    Bah. Here I was hoping you might still have it and be willing to part with it for a reasonable price.... :-P
    If I'd know the price would've been as is where is free plus the cost of shipping.

    The F80 is a very solid camera. I shoot with the N80, the U.S. variant.

    snipped
    Quote Originally Posted by abcraghead View Post
    I would advise that you get the battery grip for the F80. It's worth the investment. Not only does it give you better battery power (critical in cold weather) but it also balances the camera a bit better for when you *do* need to handhold.
    The battery grip was included in the price BTW, four AA cells are lower in price than those A123 batteries. The grip currently houses four Lithium Energizer batteries.

    Now to find some time to go doing my photography.

    Had a round of Chemo June 15th so it may be a few days before I start
    feeling what may be classed as normal..

    Bryce Lee

  3. #23
    abcraghead Guest

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    Well I didn't want one *that* bad....

    Cool that you got the grip. I find it feels a lot better that way in the hand. On the other side, though, it's way harder to be low profile that way. People see the size of the camera and automatically assume "pro" or "media" and tend to either look at you weird, make a comment about the camera (not realizing it was less than $250) or ask you what you are doing and why.

    Since you might not get out too soon, you may want to just play around with the F80 and the F100 unloaded for a while. They are similar but not quite the same and knowing how to work them without looking at the controls is very useful.

    I don't think I could ever part with my 80. Even if I got myself an F5 or F6, there's really no reason to unless it completely breaks. They aren't worth enough on the resale market anymore to sell. Yet they metering is excellent.

    Speaking of, IMO, stick it on Matrix metering mode and leave it there. Some people do spot or center-weighted for old times' sake, and claim matrix is only good for "some" situations, but I've had it on Matrix since about day one and never ever ever ever ever had an exposure error. At least, unless it involved me forgetting the camera was on manual exposure.

  4. #24
    abcraghead Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by aciphoto View Post
    However, his changes may certainly seem fast and radical to a photographer that still uses a Pentax Spotmatic or K1000 and maybe 2 lenses.
    K-1000 has been gone well nigh 2 years now, maybe longer. Certainly dropped from being primary shooter about 3+ back.

    Though I sold it and don't need it and have no complaints about what I have now, I sorely miss it. If only for the 135 SMC A f3.5 lens that was perhaps the clearest, sharpest, lightest lens I have ever used.

    Ironically both Bryce and I have glass off Schwanny, now, too. Heh.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    close to Lake Ontario in Burlington, ON Canada
    Posts
    470

    Default Bargain eh?

    Quote Originally Posted by abcraghead View Post

    Ironically both Bryce and I have glass off Schwanny, now, too. Heh.
    Gee maybe cause we both know a bargain?

    Bryce

  6. Default

    Just happened across this ancient discussion, and thought I'd chime in again now that I've been shooting on a frequent basis for a couple of years.

    I use a monopod quite a lot. It's easy to carry, can be used just about anywhere, and also doubles as a hiking staff, which I find handy when I'm wearing my backpack and climbing rough or uneven terrain.

    I find it very useful in low light conditions and also where there are crowds. I've used it in large groups of people where a tripod would have quickly gotten tripped on and/or knocked over. The monopod can be placed directly in front of you, and in so tight that if somebody does bump into it, they're also bumping into you or your lens.

    It's quick and easy to deploy, and as I mentioned it's handy in spots with a "no tripods" rule. I usually just head in using it as a walking stick. I was shooting in one museum with it and was wondering if I'd be challenged. The guard walked in, took a look and said hello to me, but not a word about the monopod. I think the main concern about tripods in most places isn't that they don't want you to get a good shot but rather they don't want folks tripping on them. Since Monopods don't have that problem, they're not as much of an issue.

    Of course when I really want a sharp image, especially with a long lens, I break out the tripod. Even with VR, it's often hard to get the same sharpness you do on a tripod. I also like night shots, and I don't care how good you are, or how advanced your camera's VR system is, you're not hand holding a 15 second shot...

    My next upgrade in the quest for ultimate sharpness is a remote release. Even with a tripod, I notice that some of my night shots have a subtle double exposure where very bright lights are visible, presumably due to the slight movement of the camera when the shutter is depressed.
    Bob Harbison
    RailroadPhotoEssays host

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